Special Immigrant Status Cases vs DACA- Interplay With The Family Court/

The United States immigration system is complex and multi-faceted, encompassing a wide range of legal mechanisms and provisions that cater to the needs and circumstances of different individuals. Two such provisions are the Special Immigrant Status (SIS) and the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). While both provisions offer important protections and benefits to eligible individuals, they differ significantly in terms of their eligibility criteria, application processes, and outcomes.

In this article, we will examine the interplay between the immigration court and the family court in SIS cases, exploring how these two courts interact in cases involving children and minors. We will also compare SIS with DACA, highlighting the key differences between these two provisions and providing a thorough analysis of the subject matter.

What is Special Immigrant Status?

Special Immigrant Status (SIS) is a provision of U.S. immigration law that allows certain categories of individuals to obtain permanent residency in the U.S. (a green card) on the basis of their special circumstances. SIS is available to individuals who have been the victims of abuse, neglect, or abandonment by a parent, or who have been abandoned or neglected by both parents. To be eligible for SIS, an individual must first petition for SIS on the basis of their special circumstances, providing evidence of their eligibility and demonstrating that their best interests would be served by obtaining SIS.

Once a SIS petition has been approved, the individual must also meet a number of other requirements, including being under the age of 21, unmarried, and living in the U.S. for at least two years prior to filing the petition. The individual must also prove that they are a resident of the U.S. and that they are not the subject of any removal proceedings.

The Role of the Immigration Court in SIS Cases

In SIS cases, the immigration court has the primary responsibility for determining the individual’s eligibility for SIS and deciding on the outcome of the case. The immigration court must consider the individual’s best interests, taking into account factors such as their age, health, family relationships, education, and ability to speak English. The immigration court must also consider any findings of abuse, neglect, or abandonment that have been made by the state court.

The Role of the Family Court in SIS Cases

In cases involving minors, the family court also plays a crucial role in determining the best interests of the child and ensuring their protection. In SIS cases, the family court may be called upon to make decisions about custody, guardianship, and residency, as well as to provide information about the child’s interests and needs.

For example, if a minor has been the victim of abuse, neglect, or abandonment by one or both parents, the family court may be called upon to make findings about these issues and to make decisions about the child’s care and protection. The family court may also be called upon to provide information about the child’s needs and interests, and to make recommendations to the immigration court about the best course of action for the child.

The Interplay between the Immigration Court and the Family Court in SIS Cases

In SIS cases, the immigration court and the family court work together to ensure that the best interests of the child are protected and that the child’s rights are upheld. For example, if a child is the victim of abuse, neglect, or abandonment, the family court may provide the immigration court with evidence and findings about these issues, which the immigration court can use to make decisions about the child’s SIS eligibility.

Similarly, if the family court has made decisions about custody or guardianship, these decisions may be taken into account by the immigration court when determining the child’s eligibility for SIS. In this way, both courts play important roles in ensuring that the child’s rights are protected and that the best interests of the child are upheld.

Comparing SIS with DACA

While both SIS and DACA offer important protections and benefits to eligible individuals, there are significant differences between these two provisions. One of the key differences is the eligibility criteria for each provision. SIS is available only to individuals who have been the victims of abuse, neglect, or abandonment by a parent, or who have been abandoned or neglected by both parents. In contrast, DACA is available to individuals who were brought to the U.S. as children and who meet certain other eligibility criteria, such as having lived in the U.S. continuously for a certain period of time.

Another difference between SIS and DACA is the type of relief each provision offers. SIS provides a pathway to permanent residency (a green card), while DACA provides only temporary relief from removal proceedings. This means that individuals who obtain SIS have a path to becoming lawful permanent residents of the U.S., while individuals who obtain DACA are only protected from removal for a limited period of time.

In conclusion, the interplay between the immigration court and the family court in SIS cases is crucial for ensuring the best interests of the child are protected and the child’s rights are upheld. Both courts play important roles in determining the individual’s eligibility for SIS and deciding on the outcome of the case, taking into account factors such as the child’s age, health, family relationships, and education.

While both SIS and DACA offer important protections and benefits to eligible individuals, there are significant differences between these two provisions, including the eligibility criteria and the type of relief offered. When considering their options, individuals should carefully consider their unique circumstances and seek the guidance of a qualified immigration lawyer to help them determine which provision is right for them.